4 Phases of Phagocytosis Flash Cards

 
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What compounds can be chemotactic for phagocytes? Complement protein, bacterial toxins, and antibodies. 0 forchette49 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:24:54 GMT view revision history
Example of a bacterium that resists digestion by a phagocyte. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 0 forchette49 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:24:54 GMT view revision history
4. Digestion The microbe-containing vesicle fuses with a lysosome. After digestion, the microorganism is expelled from the phagocyte by exocytosis. Major phagocytes include macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. 0 forchette49 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:24:54 GMT view revision history
3. Ingestion The phagocyte engulfs the microbe with its plasma membrane. The plasma membrane surrounds the microbe and pinches off around the microbe, forming a vesicle. 0 forchette49 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:24:54 GMT view revision history
2. Adherence or Attachment Because of certain microbial defenses (production of M proteins or slippery capsules), adherence of the phagocyte cell membrane to the surface of the microbe may be difficult. Coating the surface of the microorganism with complement proteins and antibody proteins facilitates phagocytosis (process is called opsonization; proteins are called opsonins). 0 forchette49 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:24:54 GMT view revision history
1. Chemotaxis The chemical attraction of phagocytes to a particular location; chemotactic chemicals that attract phagocytes include bacterial toxins components of damaged tissue cells, complement proteins, and antibodies. 0 forchette49 Tue, 06 Apr 2010 00:24:54 GMT view revision history

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